Robbery

Unlike burglary or other theft crimes, robbery involves an alleged victim being present during the commission of the alleged offense. Because robbery also involves the use of force, violence, assault, or putting in fear, such crimes are taken very seriously by prosecutors. 

Robbery can be considered both a property crime and a violent crime since the offense technically involves both an alleged theft and an alleged assault. The Florida Statutes list several different kinds of robbery charges, all of which are felony offenses that carry very serious long-term consequences for alleged offenders if they are convicted.

Lawyer for Robbery Arrests in Pensacola, FL

Do you think that you could be under investigation or were you already arrested in the Florida Panhandle for an alleged robbery? You will want to avoid making any statement to authorities until you have first contacted The Law Office of James M. Burns.

Pensacola criminal defense attorney James M. Burns aggressively defends clients accused of violent offenses in communities all over Escambia County, such as Pensacola and Perdido Key, and in Santa Rosa County, in places like Navarre, Milton, and Pace. Have our lawyer review your case and help you understand all of your legal options as soon as you call (850) 457-6002 to receive a free initial consultation.


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Overview of Robbery Crimes in Escambia County


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Robbery Charges in Florida

Florida Statute § 812.13(1) defines robbery as "the taking of money or other property which may be the subject of larceny from the person or custody of another, with intent to either permanently or temporarily deprive the person or the owner of the money or other property, when in the course of the taking there is the use of force, violence, assault, or putting in fear."

Under Florida Statute § 812.13(3)(b), an act is deemed “in the course of the taking” if it occurs either prior to, contemporaneous with, or subsequent to the alleged taking of the property and if it and the act of taking constitute a continuous series of acts or events. 

A robbery offense under the aforementioned statute is often referred to as "simple robbery," although alleged offenses involving the use of a firearm, deadly weapon, or other weapon are commonly referred to as "armed robbery" offenses. Other specific kinds of robbery crimes in the Florida Statutes include:

Robbery by sudden snatching, Florida Statute § 812.131 — More commonly known as "purse snatching" in many cases, an alleged offender commits this crime if he or she takes money or other property from the alleged victim’s person, with intent to permanently or temporarily deprive the victim or the owner of the money or other property, when, in the course of the taking, the victim was or became aware of the taking. 

The state is not required to prove that the offender used any amount of force beyond that effort necessary to obtain possession of the money or other property, or that there was any resistance offered by the victim to the offender or that there was an injury to the victim’s person.

Carjacking, Florida Statute § 812.133 — The taking of a motor vehicle which may be the subject of larceny from the person or custody of another, with intent to either permanently or temporarily deprive the person or the owner of the motor vehicle, when in the course of the taking there is the use of force, violence, assault, or putting in fear.

Home-invasion robbery, Florida Statute § 812.135 — Any robbery that occurs when the offender enters a dwelling with the intent to commit a robbery and does commit a robbery of the occupants therein.


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Robbery Penalties under Florida Chapter 812

If in the course of committing a robbery the offender carried no firearm, deadly weapon, or another weapon, the alleged crime is a second-degree felony punishable by a fine up to $10,000 and up to 15 years in prison.

If in the course of committing the robbery the offender carried a weapon, robbery is a first-degree felony punishable by up to 30 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. If the offender carried a firearm or other deadly weapon in the course of committing the robbery, the crime is a first-degree felony punishable by up to life in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

Chapter 8.2 of the Florida Standard Jury Instructions establishes that a weapon constitutes a deadly weapon "if it is used or threatened to be used in a way likely to produce death or great bodily harm." Courts in Florida have broadly defined what is capable of producing death or great bodily harm, with beer bottles and automobiles having been held as constituting deadly weapons.

Robbery by sudden snatching is a third-degree felony punishable by a fine up to $5,000 and up to five years in prison, but the crime becomes a second-degree felony if the alleged offender carried a firearm, deadly weapon, or another weapon when committing the alleged offense.

Both carjacking and home-invasion robbery are first-degree felony offenses, and alleged offenses committed without a firearm, deadly weapon, or other weapon being carried by the alleged offender are punishable by up to 30 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

If the alleged offender carried a firearm or other deadly weapon in the commission of a carjacking or home invasion robbery offense, the crime is punishable by up to life in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. 


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Escambia County Robbery Resources

Florida Statewide Robbery by Firearm, 1971-2016 — View statewide robbery statistics compiled by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE). Statistics include total robberies, robbery rates per 100,000 people, and robberies by firearm. According to this data, the number of robberies in Florida has decreased each year for the past decade.

The Law Office of James M. Burns | Pensacola Robbery Defense Attorney

If you were arrested or believe that you might be under investigation for an alleged robbery in Escambia County, it is in your best interest to exercise your right to remain silent until you have legal counsel. The Law Office of James M. Burns represents individuals Milton, Navarre, Perdido Key, Fort Walton Beach, and Pace. 

James M. Burns is a skilled criminal defense lawyer in Pensacola who also has the benefit of law enforcement experience during his time as a certified police officer.

Call (850) 457-6002 or submit an online contact form to have our attorney provide a complete evaluation of your case during a free, confidential consultation.